Introducing Guitar Dashboard. A free, open source, interactive music theory explorer for guitarists.

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I'd like to share something I've been working on: guitardashboard.com. It's something I've built initially to aid my own study of diatonic modes and chords on the guitar, but I'm also hoping that others might find it useful. Some features:

  • A chromatic circle and a circle of fifths for visualising scales and modes.
  • A guitar fretboard that displays scales and modes. You can opt to display note names or scale intervals, just select the 'settings' menu.
  • Toggle notes on the circle-of-fifths and fretboard.
  • Alternative tunings and instruments. Any stringed instrument with any tuning is potentially supported. Just select the 'tunings' menu.
  • Left handed players are welcome. Also in the 'settings' menu.

I'm self taught when it comes to music theory, so I'd really like to hear any comments, bugs, suggestions. It's open source on GitHub with an MIT licence, so feel free to take the code and use it for your own purposes. Send me a pull-request if you're of the programmerish persuasion. Links under the 'info' menu.

Enjoy! Mike

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Comments

  • Woops, I seem to have posted several copies of this by mistake. Is there anyway to delete posts?
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    Very nice!
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • RolandRoland Frets: 4067
    MikeH said:
    Woops, I seem to have posted several copies of this by mistake. Is there anyway to delete posts?
    Done
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  • superanandsuperanand Frets: 0
    This platform is an amazing one.. Took me a few days to navigate the whole website and post that thought of thanking you for sharing this platform.. Till date I was using Guitaa and was pretty satisfied with that but your suggestion is also great. Like I tried this song https://www.guitaa.com/chords/powfu-death-bed at guitar dashboard & it also gave me the same experience. 

    Thanks.. 
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  • JAYJOJAYJO Frets: 1384
    Brilliant. Can change to lefty in the settings. Will have a look at vid later cheers.
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  • DiscoStuDiscoStu Frets: 3613
    Looks good @MikeH however the layout looks wrong on my Android phone. The dials are vertical rather than left and right like on your video. Maybe needs a wee tweak to open full screen on phones? Screenshots of portrait and landscape orientations:

    https://i.imgur.com/5LZoIR8.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/nPuOD7M.jpg
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  • nick79nick79 Frets: 210
    As someone who shamefully knows very little or nothing about theory this is going to be a huge help I reckon. Thank you very much!
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  • GuyBodenGuyBoden Frets: 534
    Excellent, wow you have alternative tunings too.

    Scale name, which is the most common terminology, is it Jazz minor or Melodic minor (ascending)?


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  • FuengiFuengi Frets: 1957
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    edited June 21

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    viz said:

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    OR,

    if you know your circle of 5ths and fi d your key, you can immediately find chords 4 and 5 (left and right of your key, and chord 6 (the related minor of your key, and chords 2 and 3 (left and right of the relative minor), and chord 7 is one more to the right. 

    So, for C:

    IV is left (F)
    V is right (G)

    vi is underneath (A minor)
    ii is left (D minor)
    iii is right (E minor)

    vii is B dim. 


    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • markblagdonmarkblagdon Frets: 1529
    edited June 21
    viz said:

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    I think of them in relation to the fretboard. I use low E string as reference. Find the root note on E string, IV chord is same fret on A string (so A major in your case, V chord is up two frets on A string, so B major In your case). As this aligns with the major scale shapes, and makes you learn the note names on first two strings it works for me. The pattern is also a L7 shape for defining major and minor chords, so it’s very easy.

    https://youtu.be/qoeQeVVys38
    Karma......
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  • FuengiFuengi Frets: 1957
    viz said:

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    Really!? That always works? I had not figured that out. 
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    edited June 21
    Fuengi said:
    viz said:

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    Really!? That always works? I had not figured that out. 

    well, ish, so long as you know your keys and put the correct sharp or flat there. So the 4th of F isn't B, it's Bb. etc. But otherwise, yes, in 100% of cases, the interval from a key note can be counted synonomously with the alphabet in either direction. 
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • FuengiFuengi Frets: 1957
    viz said:
    Fuengi said:
    viz said:

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    Really!? That always works? I had not figured that out. 

    well, ish, so long as you know your keys and put the correct sharp or flat there. So the 4th of F isn't B, it's Bb. etc. But otherwise, yes, in 100% of cases, the interval from a key note can be counted synonomously with the alphabet in either direction. 
    I could never work out why there were sharps and flats and they were the same note, is this why? 

    I have sort of ignored flats up to now... This has got me looking at circle of 5th again and I can now see how useful it is. 
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    Fuengi said:
    viz said:
    Fuengi said:
    viz said:

    Fuengi said:
    Thanks for this, has got my mind back into theory. 

    Is there a quick and easy way to work out the chords for the Major scale. Say I'm playing E Maj how do I know what my IV chord is? 

    Alphabet
    Really!? That always works? I had not figured that out. 

    well, ish, so long as you know your keys and put the correct sharp or flat there. So the 4th of F isn't B, it's Bb. etc. But otherwise, yes, in 100% of cases, the interval from a key note can be counted synonomously with the alphabet in either direction. 
    I could never work out why there were sharps and flats and they were the same note, is this why? 

    I have sort of ignored flats up to now... This has got me looking at circle of 5th again and I can now see how useful it is. 
    Sort of! This might deserve a more detailed discussion though!
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • duotoneduotone Frets: 444
    edited June 29
    Thanks for that circle of fifths @viz ;;

    I am currently trying: 
    https://spinditty.com/learning/disharmony
    3. Standard Chord Progressions: A Song Your Mother Would Know

    I always thought I wasn’t getting the most out of that wheel.
    Edit: should say that I would just noodle, playing chords that were close together on the wheel that sounded ok + ‘safe’. Not very adventurous!

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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    There’s a really good youtube vid called 8 things you didn’t know about the circle of fifths or something. 
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    Fact 2 is really helpful for many. 
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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  • duotoneduotone Frets: 444
    edited June 29
    viz said:
    Fact 2 is really helpful for many. 
    Thanks again @viz ;;;;;;
    makes it mush easier/faster to navigate with the triangles
      1.                         6
    4  5.    And       2 3

    I stopped at No.2, but will watch the rest of the video.
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  • vizviz Frets: 6394
    Yes. And what about this:


    1 (ionian) is the relative major of 6 (aeolian)

    but also:
    4 (lydian) is the relative major of 2 (dorian) - they both have a raised note;

    and 5 (mixolydian) is the relative major of 3 (phrygian) - they both have a lowered note. 
    Change your search engine from google to www.ecosia.org - they plant trees when you search. Honestly, it's awesome.
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