Disgruntled after two lessons!

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  • Definitely not normal. If you came  away feeling like that there’s something wrong. When I first had guitar lessons as a teenager I absolutely loved it and couldn’t wait for the next lesson. I thought my teacher was the coolest person ever.  

    Now when I look back I realise he probably wasn’t the best teacher in the world but he had at least one essential quality - he inspired me to want to practice and get better.
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  • AlexOAlexO Frets: 537
    Guitar61 said:
    North Manchester 
    I thought this sounded like lessons I had once had.

    The North Manchester location means it must be the same bloke.
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  • Sounds like bad teaching to me, I taught for 15 years and my last job was teaching masters degree music students. Small nuggets of information should be presented, digested, demonstrated and practiced before moving on to the next, if the teacher has any experience this should also be in a coherent and logical order. Blinding you with information and then showing off is not the way to go, in honesty the only way my students would see me playing to full standard is at a gig, in a lesson my job was to present what is in front of us in a digestible way.
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  • Sounds like bad teaching to me, I taught for 15 years and my last job was teaching masters degree music students. Small nuggets of information should be presented, digested, demonstrated and practiced before moving on to the next, if the teacher has any experience this should also be in a coherent and logical order. Blinding you with information and then showing off is not the way to go, in honesty the only way my students would see me playing to full standard is at a gig, in a lesson my job was to present what is in front of us in a digestible way.
    This.

    I rarely have to play any advanced stuff in lessons, so most material is slow tempo'd chords or pentatonics. Or simple picking exercises. I never ever show off either. That's not what they pay me for. Just keep it basic and demonstrate.

    And having structure is key, not random made-up winged lessons each week.
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  • danowensdanowens Frets: 9
    edited September 2019
    I teach out of Bolton and I've been horrified by some of the experiences that my students have had prior to learning with me. I'm working with an adult learner at the moment who is very vague about her goals, she just wants to play guitar. 

    It is my responsibility as an experienced teacher to read between the lines: she wants to be able to play guitar in a way that doesn't mean she's performing on stage but that she can recall some tunes to play for anyone who asks "oh you play guitar?".

    I've been teaching her for 2 years and although she puts in practice, she's slower to pick certain things up (like chord fingering). So I just do LOADS of it. I start of with Em and Am and work through some two chord songs. I introduce a capo so things sound slightly different, but the cognitive load is still low as not to intimidate her or to collapse her self esteem. The idea of scales is alien to her, and until she asks to learn them, I'm not going to show her.

    There's a million blues tunes out there with tiny variations on 3 chords, and I separate both hands to keep the cognitive load low. 

    I know most guitar teachers don't consider pedagogy, and I think every one of their students suffers for it.
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  • KRSKRS Frets: 7
    edited September 2019
    Hey there @Guitar61, I'm also a guitar tutor, and yep I've heard that one before. First of all if you feel you need some tuition, find someone else. This dude may be OK but not for what you want. Unless you want to learn a shed load of pentatonic scales. 
    I'd reckon most of my students want to just 'play guitar and get better'. I would start with some good books. Something like Rockschool grade 1 or lower depending on how comfortable with the material you are. Get books with actual songs and riffs and a few technical exercises. That's a good start. 
    The first book I bought was 'The Guitar Handbook' by Ralph Denyer. It's very good, and as a bonus there's loads of stuff about pentatonics. Seriously though, it's got a lot of information in it, not much in the way of songs though. There's lots of great stuff for beginners. It's worth looking at. 

    Edit. Didn't read OP properly. Dude is not ok. If you had three hours you should have really been playing for about 2 hours 30 minutes maybe. With a bit of demonstration and explanation and good old fashioned Q&A. Tutor asking 'is this A or Bb minor' for example. That kind of thing.

    Not telling you about gigs. It's kind of an unwritten rule amongst tutors. You know, try to not show off too much. And always try to teach. It's not standup. 
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  • I would start with technical exercises. picking exercises, fretting hand exercises. then pick one chord shape like E major and learn to fret and strum it cleanly. if your are not connecting to your fingers, its a waste paying for lessons, or learning chords at this stage. you can then build up co-ordination over a month, if you practice every day. im sure you can find this stuff on youtube or google, and keep it simple!
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