Decline in bird & insect numbers??

What's Hot
RockerRocker Frets: 3511
I have noticed a serious decline in the numbers of birds and insects this year (compared to last year and years previous).

Birds:
Fewer swallows and housemartins.  A noticeable reduction in the numbers of wood pigeons, crows and starlings.  Numbers of traditional garden birds appear to be holding up, ie normal.  Numbers of green finches appears to be on the increase after the virus that decimated the numbers of the species a few years ago.

Insects:
Greatly reduced numbers and varieties of butterflies.  Numbers of wild bees are greatly down compared to last year

Anyone in the UK notice a similar pattern? 
Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. [Albert Einstein]

Nil Satis Nisi Optimum

1reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
«1

Comments

  • Nope. Shit tons of insects and birds near me. Maybe they decided to move to the city?
    TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE DISASTER
    Kare wa amanojaku desu
    彼は天邪鬼です
    0reaction image LOL 1reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • BridgehouseBridgehouse Frets: 18960
    I’ve seen more butterflies and dragonflies in our garden this year than I have for 5 years or so. 

    Less bees tho. A lot more wood pigeons (mostly mating in our trees!) and also saw my first kingfisher by the river next to us. 

    Last week I heard (and saw) a woodpecker in one of our willows which was the first time I’d seen one for a few years as well. 
    0reaction image LOL 1reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • robertyroberty Frets: 1643

    Across the world, more than 40 per cent of insect species are declining and a third are endangered, the analysis found. The rate of extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles. The total mass of insects is falling by a precipitous 2.5 per cent a year, according to the best data available, suggesting they could vanish within a century.


    https://www.unenvironment.org/news-and-stories/story/insect-declines-are-stark-warning-humanity

    Insects are part of the food chain... so quite important really!
    1reaction image LOL 1reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • RandallFlaggRandallFlagg Frets: 8988
    Yep, hardly a butterfly here in Norfolk, fewer bees and wasps are pretty much gone. Not seen a mayfly or dragon fly all summer. There are fewer pigeons as well but they tend to come in in winter along with the pheasants and deer, looking for food.

    The Housemartin's are back, I was watching them flitting around and twittering above the house and field over the back on Monday evening, feeding on airborne insects I guess. It was quite a happy hour.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • LastMantraLastMantra Frets: 690
    I thought the plan was we would all be eating insects in the future? Now what?
    MYMUSIC

    I wanna be a door
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • VimFuegoVimFuego Frets: 8407
    seen more song birds this year than ever, presumably this means lots of bugs to eat. I put this down to it being a largely livestock farming area, so much lower use of pesticides and lots of hedgerows. 

    I'm not locked in here with you, you are locked in here with me.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • JezWyndJezWynd Frets: 3493
    Seen very few butterflies this year, far fewer than last year. Sparrows have done well though, which is good to see. First time in years that I've seen a flock of them, nowhere near the size of the hedgerow flocks I used to see 40-50 years ago but a definite uptick.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SassafrasSassafras Frets: 17283
    Fuckin cats kill all the birds round here.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • OctafishOctafish Frets: 1872
    Sassafras said:
    Fuckin cats kill all the birds round here.
    Well stop fuckin cats then!
    7reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • KeikoKeiko Frets: 196
    There was a long period of really bad weather this spring that has ruined the breeding season for a lot of birds Im sure.  We had a goldfinch nest completely destroyed by the wind and rain, it had eggs in it. Not sure if the baby blue tits fledged this year out of the nextbox or if they all died. I'll have a look in the next couple of weeks. One of the adults went missing and the other one seemed to struggle to keep up the feeding on its own.

    Green space is disappearing pretty fast too. Housing estates popping up everywhere. Even one of our local nature reserves is getting a road built right through the center of it.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HAL9000HAL9000 Frets: 5254
    In the past we’ve had greenfinches, blue tits, long tail tits, great tits, nuthatches, etc at the feeders. This year we’ve had a handful of blue tits.
    It might look like I'm listening to you, but in my head I'm playing my guitar.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • tony99tony99 Frets: 2665
    How many insects were there last year?
    Bollocks you don't know Bono !!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • proggyproggy Frets: 2856
    A few weeks ago I saw some house sparrows in London, that is an extremely rare sight.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • VimFuegoVimFuego Frets: 8407
    we've a flock of house sparrows in a hawthorn outside our bedroom, the little cockneys always wake up at about 5 and start shrieking and fighting with each other and anyone else who passes. 

    I'm not locked in here with you, you are locked in here with me.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • BigLicks67BigLicks67 Frets: 740
    We have got 2 wood pigeons, 2 collared doves, 2 blackbirds, greenfinches and a family of sparrows living in the trees at the back of our garden. We also get visits from Goldfinch, Starlings  a Robin, Blue tits and a Heron and every blue moon a Sparrowhawk. Also every night at dusk a pipistrelle bat appears. On top of that there are 3 House Martin nests on our street. So things are pretty good this year. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • KittyfriskKittyfrisk Frets: 1902
    I guess its probably a location thing?
    In N.E.England I have had more house sparrows this year than in many previous years. The place is jumping!
    The usual dunnocks, collared doves, wood pigeons, greenfinches, blue tits, coal tits, siskins,robins, starlings, blackbirds, thrushes, occasional ducks & sodding noisy jackdaws.

    Fewer of the usual butterflies; small tortoiseshell, red admiral & peacocks but loads of moths, except sadly no hummingbird hawkmoths this year at all.
    I reckon the prolonged cool wet winters of the last couple of years might have had an impact to the insects.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • scrumhalfscrumhalf Frets: 6005
    I've noticed far fewer flies this year. Maybe there's a decline in dog turds for them to sunbathe on.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • 57Deluxe57Deluxe Frets: 6829
    very few butterflies on my Buddleia this year...

    <Vintage BOSS Upgrades>
    __________________________________
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • lasermonkeylasermonkey Frets: 1703
    Considering our garden is quite small, we get good numbers of birds visiting. It does depend on the time of year as to what shows up, but it's been consistently good over the past few years. That said, we almost never get chaffinches any more. Insect numbers aren't great in the garden, with the amount of moths down drastically, even from last year. I have recently become quite fascinated by moths and have ID'd just a handful of species, with just one or two examples. I'm hopefully borrowing a light trap soon so I can get a better idea of what's around.

    On a recent holiday in the Suffolk Coastal area, we stayed in a log cabin in the middle of a wildflower meadow, surrounded by hedgerows. I counted almost fifty different species of moth in the week we were there, including a couple of impressive poplar hawk moths, and that was without any specialist equipment. I took loads of pics.

    But that's a particularly good place to go and not necessarily representative of the country as a whole. Certainly, we have noticed far fewer bug splats on the windscreen on long journeys. That's actually a pretty good indicator, and it's widely reported that this is happening everywhere.

    I remember as a kid in the 70s seeing large tortoiseshell butterflies in some numbers. They're now extinct in the UK. I'm sure I'm seeing fewer and fewer butterflies, despite actively looking out for them. This year in the garden we've had holly blue, brimstone, small white, large white, peacock, red admiral, painted lady, gatekeeper, comma and orange-tip. No small torties so far this year. We have also had common blue damselflies, a banded demoiselle and what looked like an immature broad-bodied chaser dragonfly yesterday. As for moths, I've so far identified cinnabar, large yellow underwing (that one came in with the washing), rustic, common wainscot and what I'm sure was a scarlet tiger flying over the garden. Oh, and I found a large, winged Roesel's bush cricket last week, the winged ones being somewhat rare.

    What's depressing is the amount of apparently common birds on the RSPB's Red List. Part of the Red List's criteria is that the species' breeding population must have declined by at least 50% over the past 25 years. That list includes starlings, house sparrows, tree sparrows and song thrushes! When you look at the amount of habitat being lost in the south east due to new housing, it's hardly surprising.
    My wife asked me to stop singing Wonderwall.
    I said maybe.....
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SnagsSnags Frets: 1749
    If anything we've got more birds in our garden  and Woody Woodpecker had been more then usual. Fewer dragonflies, but the pond is a disgrace at the moment.

    Insects, not a clue. Unless it's a wasp giving me shit, or ants getting in the house,  I try to ignore them. Although we do seem to have had more flies in than normal. Probably should wash more often.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • JohnspreyerJohnspreyer Frets: 33
    For the first time ever, there are no swallows in our garage this year.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • proggyproggy Frets: 2856
    For the first time ever, there are no swallows in our garage this year.


    Just the Suzuki Swift....
    1reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • TheMarlinTheMarlin Frets: 2249
    My garden is resplendent with bird and infect life.  I’m a catch and release kinda guy, is if bees or butterflies get into my house, a carefully catch and release them back outside. 

    Except for wasps, f#@k wasps, I get the Dyson out, and enjoy the dull thud as they bounce off the inside of the extender hose. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • CirrusCirrus Frets: 4647
    Sassafras said:
    Fuckin cats kill all the birds round here.
    People get too worked up about cats.
    Captain Horizon (my old band);
    Very (!) Occasional Blog
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • RockerRocker Frets: 3511
    Nope. Shit tons of insects and birds near me. Maybe they decided to move to the city?
    The large number of insects might suggest a reduction in the bird numbers.  Birds feed on insects thus keeping their numbers in check.  Unless there is another source of bird food...
    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. [Albert Einstein]

    Nil Satis Nisi Optimum

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • My real shock was the realisation that we have to transport bees from field to field to pollinate, because wild populations both can't keep up with our intensive farming and because wild populations are in a state of global decline (and quite fast - I recall a colleague saying approximately 40 percent decline in bees in the last 10 or 15 years world wide)

    Bees are not the only pollinator going of course. I've actually noticed an increase in both birds and insects near Cambridge - I think improved farming practice has helped. 

    However, I think it's a bit nuts we import pheasants solely to shoot them - many escape, meaning we are artificially introducing a non native, competitive species that actively eats the same food as many of our song birds. Some strange traditions we have
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SassafrasSassafras Frets: 17283
    Cirrus said:
    Sassafras said:
    Fuckin cats kill all the birds round here.
    People get too worked up about cats.
    How do you work out my hating the murderous filthy, stinking bastards with every fibre of my body and wishing they'd all rot in hell is getting too worked up, I can take them or leave them.
    4reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ESBlondeESBlonde Frets: 2991
    We get a few birds in the front garden because we mulch heavily and they scatter the mulch to find insects or worms. In the tiny back garden we have been feeding everyday this year until about 3 weeks ago when we cut down to encourage natural feed cycles and strengthen the instinct in the fledglings. We have a few wood pigeons, three ring neck doves, a couple of black birds and this year 14 startlings produced 7 fledglings becoming our biggest contribution to the local populus. Other birds visit but not so much. We also have a family of gray squirrells in the large trees/hedge at the foot of the garden beside the footpath where a couple of hazelnut trees flourish. On our allotment we don't direct feed, but again heavy mulch provides year round food and we leave the likes of sunflowers and other seeded flowers and over ripe fruits for the birds. We net to keep birds (mainly wood pigeons) off the greens until we've had our fill. The insect house I built a couple of years ago never seems busy, but it's hard to tell. The plot is also home to a family of field mice that live in the compost and help themselves to food and a mole that does mole things because our worm population is well  developed.
    The front garden is a good flower filled space and gets bees and other insects, but not in the way one would have expected years ago. Few people in our immediate area garden much and the general lack of environment suitable for wildlife is noted.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • lasermonkeylasermonkey Frets: 1703
    My real shock was the realisation that we have to transport bees from field to field to pollinate, because wild populations both can't keep up with our intensive farming and because wild populations are in a state of global decline (and quite fast - I recall a colleague saying approximately 40 percent decline in bees in the last 10 or 15 years world wide)

    Bees are not the only pollinator going of course. I've actually noticed an increase in both birds and insects near Cambridge - I think improved farming practice has helped. 

    However, I think it's a bit nuts we import pheasants solely to shoot them - many escape, meaning we are artificially introducing a non native, competitive species that actively eats the same food as many of our song birds. Some strange traditions we have
    Not only that, many raptors are illegally shot or trapped because of the possibility they might predate upon birds, native and non native, that a certain few want to shoot.
    It's utterly fucked up.
    My wife asked me to stop singing Wonderwall.
    I said maybe.....
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • DominicDominic Frets: 5482
    We have great birdlife ...........numerous Partridge ,Pheasant but daily visits from Kestrel , Kite ,Buzzards, Sparrowhak , Yaffel ,There is also a huge bird of prey we see from time to time about twice a year for the last 10 years .I think it's an Eagle of some kind ....it has Traces on it's legs so I guess it's an escapee .I saw the Kestrel take a Partridge back in May this year.
    Tawny Owl and various treecreepers and Finches .Get some Jays too which aren't so common now.
    Insects ?.....every year we are plagued by Hornets ,starting around June onwards......have never been able to find the nest but we get hundreds around the windows and any light source at night.
    I bought a Butcher shop type UV lamp grid and fitted outside back door.........you can hear a snap every 3 or 4 minutes as another one of the bastards fries every night if not raining.........I got stung 3 times in under a minute last year and couldn't move my arm for a day......hate them.
    Really strange and sad but last week we had 2 male woodpeckers fly into a window within 10 minutes of each other..both died on the spot.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Sign In or Register to comment.