Best way to store acoustic in cold room?

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zepp76zepp76 Frets: 775
edited November 12 in Acoustics
As I can’t afford to keep the heating on in most of my house I was wondering what would be the best way to store my acoustic? At the moment I have it out on a stand but would it be more sensible to keep it in its fitted hard case which would still be in the same room? I am just worried about any changes that may occur if I keep taking the guitar in and out of its case. What’s the forum wisdom please?
Now when the day goes to sleep and the full moon looks
And the night is so black that the darkness cooks
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  • droflufdrofluf Frets: 253
    I’m assuming that you play it in the same room that it’s kept? If so I’d keep it on its stand. Your big enemy is humidity; from what you say money is tight but it may be worth getting a humidity meter? I have this one https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07GWL6ZFV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_ZaWYDbJJD6NVW

    About £7 and accurate. At the very least you’ll know what’s happening. 
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  • From what I understand, the issue isn't so much cold itself as sudden extreme changes in temperature - so if you take a guitar from a nice warm room outside into the snow, disaster beckons. If, on the other hand, your room changes temperature gradually over a period of at least an hour or so, probably two or more (which it will when the heating comes on/goes off), it should be ok. Let's face it, pretty much everyone else's house is like that - mine certainly is, and I've never had any issues with my acoustics.
    If you must have sex with a frog, wear a condom. If you want the frog to have fun, rib it.
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  • zepp76zepp76 Frets: 775
    Thank you for your replies, as long as the cold has no serious adverse effects on the guitar I’m happy. 
    Now when the day goes to sleep and the full moon looks
    And the night is so black that the darkness cooks
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  • ToneControlToneControl Frets: 6343
    edited November 13
    what acoustic is it anyway?
    if it has more laminated wood it should be safer

    If you do heat the room for a period every day, there will be big humidity drops, so don't leave it on a stand

    I think that if you run the heating up to 20C once or twice a day, and then let it drop to 11C (for example) twice a day, then you should keep it in the case, since every time you warm up the room, the humidity temporarily drops massively, so your guitar would get 2 cycles of dry/humid every day - I think it's best to keep it in the case so that you only bring it out into a warmed room. If possible, stop the case cooling down too much by putting it somewhere insulated (in a spare bed under the covers, in a dry cupboard not on an external or cold wall, etc.)

    I'd add that when I've lived in a cold house, the background humidity is often high, worth checking that. As advised, get a £5 humidity detector from Amazon
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  • CloudNineCloudNine Frets: 3064
    Always worth noting this. Your biggest enemy is LOW HUMIDITY. Not really wanting to start one of these debates again, as people seem incredibly ill informed and assume because we live in UK all will be well, but if you have cold clear winter weather, and your central heating is cranking, there is a good chance you will have humidity down to well below 35%. Over a long period of time, this could cause cracks in a guitar.

    A cold ish room is definitely preferable to a room with very low humidity.
    # Previously Stevieb76 on the old Music Radar #
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  • ToneControlToneControl Frets: 6343
    CloudNine said:
    Always worth noting this. Your biggest enemy is LOW HUMIDITY. Not really wanting to start one of these debates again, as people seem incredibly ill informed and assume because we live in UK all will be well, but if you have cold clear winter weather, and your central heating is cranking, there is a good chance you will have humidity down to well below 35%. Over a long period of time, this could cause cracks in a guitar.

    A cold ish room is definitely preferable to a room with very low humidity.
    yes, when it's snowing, a warm room can drop below 30%
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  • zepp76zepp76 Frets: 775
    what acoustic is it anyway?
    if it has more laminated wood it should be safer

    If you do heat the room for a period every day, there will be big humidity drops, so don't leave it on a stand

    I think that if you run the heating up to 20C once or twice a day, and then let it drop to 11C (for example) twice a day, then you should keep it in the case, since every time you warm up the room, the humidity temporarily drops massively, so your guitar would get 2 cycles of dry/humid every day - I think it's best to keep it in the case so that you only bring it out into a warmed room. If possible, stop the case cooling down too much by putting it somewhere insulated (in a spare bed under the covers, in a dry cupboard not on an external or cold wall, etc.)

    I'd add that when I've lived in a cold house, the background humidity is often high, worth checking that. As advised, get a £5 humidity detector from Amazon
    It’s a solid top, back and sides Tanglewood X15 NS and at £650 although not a lot to some is the most expensive acoustic I’ve ever had so want to look after it. There will be NO heating in the living room where it’s kept, it’s a large space and takes a lot to heat it, something I just can’t afford to do at the moment. I’m worried because it’s only going to get a lot colder come winter time. Would it be best to just put it in its case and not remove it until things start to warm up? I have a cheap acoustic I could put out for when the mood strikes me to play it.
    Now when the day goes to sleep and the full moon looks
    And the night is so black that the darkness cooks
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  • ToneControlToneControl Frets: 6343
    zepp76 said:
    what acoustic is it anyway?
    if it has more laminated wood it should be safer

    If you do heat the room for a period every day, there will be big humidity drops, so don't leave it on a stand

    I think that if you run the heating up to 20C once or twice a day, and then let it drop to 11C (for example) twice a day, then you should keep it in the case, since every time you warm up the room, the humidity temporarily drops massively, so your guitar would get 2 cycles of dry/humid every day - I think it's best to keep it in the case so that you only bring it out into a warmed room. If possible, stop the case cooling down too much by putting it somewhere insulated (in a spare bed under the covers, in a dry cupboard not on an external or cold wall, etc.)

    I'd add that when I've lived in a cold house, the background humidity is often high, worth checking that. As advised, get a £5 humidity detector from Amazon
    It’s a solid top, back and sides Tanglewood X15 NS and at £650 although not a lot to some is the most expensive acoustic I’ve ever had so want to look after it. There will be NO heating in the living room where it’s kept, it’s a large space and takes a lot to heat it, something I just can’t afford to do at the moment. I’m worried because it’s only going to get a lot colder come winter time. Would it be best to just put it in its case and not remove it until things start to warm up? I have a cheap acoustic I could put out for when the mood strikes me to play it.
    I'd say keep it in its case, but take it out to play it
    what temperature is the room when it's below zero outside?

    In any case don't take it out when it's below zero outside
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  • My room was high 60s in summer and is now 42% RH and already I've got a sharp fret end or two. Might have to run a roasting hot bath and leave the doors open
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  • KittyfriskKittyfrisk Frets: 1832
    OK, for comparison/information/ridicule etc. I live in the North East, UK. 
    I have many (very many, far too many) guitars that are cased/uncased, acoustic/electric and they have lived in my 17th century stone house for years.
    Sounds a bit poncy quoting the building dates, but it is what it is. Let's just say it's just a regular, old, stone built terrace, OK?

    I have had no issues apart from an occasional minor truss rod adjustment over 20+ years.
    Or, an occasional slight dusting of dry surface mold on guitar surfaces over the summer months, when things aren't being played frequently (come on, I'm a bloke, I don't really do routine dusting...).
    Am I lucky? I really hope so, or do I just have a vaguely stable balanced environment?
    Indoors, my thermal comfort zone is about 18-20º max. in winter with the heating on and roughly 10-15º the rest of the year.  
    Maybe I'm just a rufty tufty Northener, or maybe it's just what I'm used to, no big deal.

    I have a dehumidifier running at about 45% most of the time in the cellar/basement where most of the guitars live, as it's below ground & has 'ahem' damp issues.

    Can't help but wonder if modern, overly heated & accordingly more humid, centrally heated dwellings aren't possibly a component  ;)
    And retire to a safe distance...  :) :)
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  • BigLicks67BigLicks67 Frets: 726
    I think the sensible option here is get a hygrometer and if the humidity drops below 40% then put your guitar in it's case. Also, don't hang your guitar from an outside facing wall in the winter if it's all solid wood.
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  • TimmyOTimmyO Frets: 4033
    I think the sensible option here is get a hygrometer and if the humidity drops below 40% then put your guitar in it's case. Also, don't hang your guitar from an outside facing wall in the winter if it's all solid wood.
    Assuming you also hydrate the case right? Otherwise you're just locking in a dry atmosphere 
    "Congratulations on being officially the most right anyone has ever been about anything, ever." -- Noisepolluter knows the score
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  • BigLicks67BigLicks67 Frets: 726
    TimmyO said:
    I think the sensible option here is get a hygrometer and if the humidity drops below 40% then put your guitar in it's case. Also, don't hang your guitar from an outside facing wall in the winter if it's all solid wood.
    Assuming you also hydrate the case right? Otherwise you're just locking in a dry atmosphere 
    Not necessarily, depends on the case and I'm not particularly trusting of some case humidifiers, as they have been known to cause more trouble than they solve.
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  • TimmyOTimmyO Frets: 4033
    Shutting dry air doesn't seem helpful.

    The Planet waves Humidipack system doesn't use water - I've got those in the case of my D28A and a Humiditrack sensor confirming it's keeping it in the right range 
    "Congratulations on being officially the most right anyone has ever been about anything, ever." -- Noisepolluter knows the score
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