Locking tuner stagger height

DefaultMDefaultM Frets: 3065
I'm getting some hipshot griplocks and noticed that there are 3 stagger options. 
For a regular Strat neck whats the benefit to each height please? There's 18-20, 19-21, and 20-23mm.

Also does anyone have a comparison of the 2 sizes in vintage tuner buttons they do? There's the D05 and the D10, small and large, but no comparison photo.
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 6695
    The post height depends on headstock thickness, the height difference between the headstock face and the nut and what break angle you require.

    The larger key buttons suit 3x3 headstocks. The smaller buttons are for 6-in-line and Musicman 4+2 headstocks.
    Be seeing you.
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  • DefaultMDefaultM Frets: 3065
    Thanks very much. D05 it is then, but they all seem out of stock in chrome. 

    I was thinking maybe the taller tuners allowed more of a break angle, but I think that might be the opposite case? I think I'm just going to get the regular set and use a tree.
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  • ICBMICBM Frets: 48687
    My experience is that you always need a tree on 6-in-line Fender-style headstocks, even with staggered posts - there just isn't enough break angle on the top two strings otherwise. I fit them in descending height order 6,5,4,2,1,3 (or 6/5, 4/2, 1/3 if there are only three different heights) which gives the best break angle for the G string (the one which causes the most problems if there's a tree) and minimises friction at the tree itself.

    "Take these three items, some WD-40, a vise grip, and a roll of duct tape. Any man worth his salt can fix almost any problem with this stuff alone." - Walt Kowalski

    "Just because I don't care, doesn't mean I don't understand." - Homer Simpson

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  • Philly_QPhilly_Q Frets: 8341
    edited January 10
    DefaultM said:
    I was thinking maybe the taller tuners allowed more of a break angle, but I think that might be the opposite case? I think I'm just going to get the regular set and use a tree.

    The shorter tuners give more of a break angle, but there's also the element of how far each tuner is from the nut because that also affects the angle.

    You'd normally use taller posts for the low strings and shorter posts for the high strings.  I think when Fender first started using staggered tuners they used conventional tuners for the low E and A, then shorter posts for D to high E.

    You could use various combinations of post heights (as @ICBM suggests), but always tall for low E and short for high E. 

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  • SteveRobinsonSteveRobinson Frets: 3460
    tFB Trader
    Philly_Q said:

    You could use various combinations of post heights (as @ICBM suggests), but always tall for low E and short for high E. 

    If a string tree is fitted the shortest is better on the G as the string guide is the determinant of break angle for B and E strings.
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  • Philly_QPhilly_Q Frets: 8341

    Good idea, I'd never thought of that. 

    I'm trying to think how many different post heights different manufacturers use.  I think Sperzel maybe use 3 different heights, in pairs, but I think my '90s Fender (with a string tree) just had 2 tall, 4 short.

    On the Eric Johnson Strat and some CS models, Fender use vintage Kluson-style tuners with staggered posts, I think all 6 may be different heights.  The high E one almost disappears into the headstock.

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