Anyone know about wood burners?

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boogiemanboogieman Frets: 7778
Looking to replace our traditional fireplace and have a wood burner or multifuel stove put in. There seem to be hundreds of makes and models out there and it’s getting pretty confusing. The universal advice seems to be to avoid the cheaply made Chinese made stoves that Machine Mart and others sell, apart from that I’m a bit clueless.  

Does anyone have any experience or advice for a decent make or model? We only need a 5kw stove which avoids the need for extra air vents. Budget around £1k or less ideally. 
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  • tony99tony99 Frets: 4663
    edited January 13
    put your gloves on when you go to get your fresh logs out of your shed because of spiders and that
    Bollocks you don't know Bono !!
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  • merlinmerlin Frets: 3640
    You'll need to get your chimney lined which will put up the overall cost. There is a certain danger of Carbon Monoxide, so you may be getting into slightly dangerous areas with leakage through walls and chimney braces if you don't. 

    We have a Jotul in the front room downstairs and s smaller Hunter in the rear. Both chimneys are lined. 

    When the two are running, we can pretty much open all the doors and turn off the heating and we're good for the whole house. Make sure you have adequate air flow through the house. And a CO alarm. 
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  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 7778
    We’ve had a guy around today and he’s looked at the chimney, which he thinks is a 9” and pot lined. He’s not sure if it needs lining or not and a lot will depend on the type of stove we chose... some apparently won’t work on a 9” flue. 
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  • strtdvstrtdv Frets: 1946
    edited January 13
    Whether you need vents depends on the age of the house as far as I know (older houses are draughty enough that for a 5kW burner you likely won't need any, but if you live in a house with a B EPC rating you probably will)

    If you're in a smokeless zone you'll need a DEFRA approved one (they are available in 5kW output models so you're fine there) 
    If your chimney isn't clay lined then you'll need full flue lining, but if they're lined already I'm not sure whether further lining is necessary (your installer will be able to advise).

    They should do a smoke pellet test once fitted to make sure the draw is sufficient and there's no recirculation of smoke as this is a carbon monoxide risk.
    You'll need a CO sensor in the room.

    They'll likely be banned eventually as they generate fine particulate matter which is linked to respiratory illness
    Robot Lords of Tokyo, SMILE TASTE KITTENS!
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  • fields5069fields5069 Frets: 3749
    edited January 13
    The only thing I know about them is that the government appear to be planning to restrict the type of fuel you use. They can be very bad for pollution, both inside and outside the home.
    Some folks like water, some folks like wine.
    My feedback thread is here.
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  • VimFuegoVimFuego Frets: 10164
    We ended up going to a local wood stove shop, and used a brand that they recommended that is made locally (somerset I think). The shop and the brand were well recommended by people in the village as well. I guess that'd be my advice, find a trusted local dealer and talk to them.
    Re lining the chimney, when we had our 10 years ago it wasn't a legal requirement then, but many insurers won't insure if you don't. That said, can't recall last time I was asked about it at renewal time.

    I'm not locked in here with you, you are locked in here with me.

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  • BoromedicBoromedic Frets: 1936
    I know next to nothing about them other than the fact we have a Hunter one installed and it's great! We had to have a chimney liner and the whole install with fireplace and slate hearth wasn't cheap but it's lush when it's lit. 

    .....I don't care if you're big in the city, nothing at all is what that means.


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  • NPPNPP Frets: 204
    @strtdv has covered a lot already. We got a small 5kw one installed 2 years ago; I was sceptical because of the cost involved but glad we had it when the boiler packed in over Christmas and the new year and the small wood burner was the only heating in the house for nearly three weeks.

    Cost of installation was far higher than the cost of the stove so it doesn't really make sense to go for the cheapest model. We narrowed it down to a choice between a Danish-made Heta and a Welsh-made Penguin and in the end went with the Heta, can't remember why, I think emissions played a role.  


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  • VimFuego said:
    We ended up going to a local wood stove shop, and used a brand that they recommended that is made locally (somerset I think). The shop and the brand were well recommended by people in the village as well. I guess that'd be my advice, find a trusted local dealer and talk to them.
    Re lining the chimney, when we had our 10 years ago it wasn't a legal requirement then, but many insurers won't insure if you don't. That said, can't recall last time I was asked about it at renewal time.
    Agree with the local brand. We bought from a local company (Chilli Penguin) that makes stoves. Something broke within the warranty period, they took it away, repaired it and replaced most part, it came back like new. 

    An accredited installer will make sure it complies with the regs. We used a 5 inch flue. One installer wanted to fill the space between the flue and the chimney with some other insulation; I did not take up that offer, I don't think it's necessary and would be nightmate to remove. We used a flue cowl that simply clamps on to the existing chimney, so you just drop down the flue and clamp it. Some installers wanted scaffolding, concreting etc, but we avoided that with a cherry picker. 
    Getting a fair sized plinth with plenty of it in front of the stove is a good idea, we used a slate slab. Oh and get a set of flexible rods to clean the flue, for about £100, doing it yourself saves a lot over the years. 
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  • ThePrettyDamnedThePrettyDamned Frets: 5311
    edited January 13
    There is some risk they will be banned over the next couple of decades due to particulates and being in efficient compared with modern methods (likewise our beloved gas hob... It'll be a sad day we say goodbye to that).

    I've little else to add, other than a colleague of mine recently had theirs removed because they wanted to upgrade to a modern alternative. No idea on what it was or anything, came with their house (I just asked them about it!).

    Just edit: if not banned, tighter regulations will likely come into play, so don't cheap out! A good one can be more efficient apparently. 
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  • droflufdrofluf Frets: 915
    We had one in our last house and it was great - a massive Morso stove. But it really triggered my wife's asthma, since we moved to a house with central heating she's been a lot better. I'm a fan of them but if any of your family have respiratory issues you may want to reconsider.
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  • teradaterada Frets: 4819
    We got one installed about 3 months ago. Was advised by the installer that this website (https://www.stoveworlduk.co.uk/) was great and reasonable. Ended up going for the multi fuel ecosy panoramic which has been burning pretty much constantly since installation. It’s been superb. 
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  • martmart Frets: 4216
    NPP said:
    ...
    Cost of installation was far higher than the cost of the stove so it doesn't really make sense to go for the cheapest model. ...
    This. We got one about 10 years ago and the stove was only £500 or so, but the total, including liner was £2k.
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  • I'd be concerned that the Gov will look to place more restrictions on them.
    My trading feedback

    is it crazy how saying sentences backwards creates backwards sentences saying how crazy it is?

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  • RolandRoland Frets: 4809
    edited January 13
    Do you have a source of wood?There's real concern about particulates, particularly from green timber. There's legislation coming to prevent the sale of logs which haven't been kiln dried.That's obviously going to push costs up. Our house came with a multi-fuel stove installed when we bought it 25 years ago. It works best burning wood on a bed of coal. In that time we've never bought firewood. Instead I grab any trees which are felled locally, log them into 2 to 3 foot lengths, and stack for a couple of years to give them time to season.


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  • CHRISB50CHRISB50 Frets: 2463
    We’ve just moved into a house with a Stovax multi fuel burner. Seems pretty good so far. 

    I can't help about the shape I'm in, I can't sing I ain't pretty and my legs are thin

    But don't ask me what I think of you, I might not give the answer that you want me to

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  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 7778
    Thanks guys. Plenty to think about so far. 

    For those who had recent installs, what’s the rough cost of installation? We’d be looking at having the chimney opening widened, installing the liner and a stone or slate hearth put in. 

    @Roland we’ve just bought a place in the countryside so wood supply shouldn’t be an issue. We’ve been grabbing deadfall stuff when we see it on public land (there’s a big oak in the lane next to us that’s been dropping branches) and there’s also plenty of local suppliers for seasoned logs. 
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  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 7778
    edited January 13
    CHRISB50 said:
    We’ve just moved into a house with a Stovax multi fuel burner. Seems pretty good so far. 
    Interesting. The guy who just did a survey said Stovax were one of his recommendations. Heta was another. 
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  • ronnybronnyb Frets: 1144
    We’ve got a town and country stove, I think they’re made in Yorkshire. We’ve had it a few years and I remember being advised to get a steel one rather than cast because there’s no danger of them cracking. Didn’t have the chimney lined just did a smoke test. It works fine.
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  • droflufdrofluf Frets: 915
    boogieman said:
    Thanks guys. Plenty to think about so far. 

    For those who had recent installs, what’s the rough cost of installation? We’d be looking at having the chimney opening widened, installing the liner and a stone or slate hearth put in. 

    @Roland we’ve just bought a place in the countryside so wood supply shouldn’t be an issue. We’ve been grabbing deadfall stuff when we see it on public land (there’s a big oak in the lane next to us that’s been dropping branches) and there’s also plenty of local suppliers for seasoned logs. 
    Make sure it’s properly dry before you try to burn it. Damp wood pollutes more, will gum up your chimney and doesn’t put out as much heat. 
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  • chotu495chotu495 Frets: 253
    We have a Woodwarm 5kw. Was about £1500, and after installation, final price was about £2300. 

    They’re expensive with a pro install. Chimney lined, insulation filled around it (vermiculite?). Hetas approved instal certificate. Carbon monoxide detector in the room with it and also the bedroom.

    The logs we use are kiln-dried.

    Wouldn’t ever call it value for money, but they are lovely things to have through the winter.
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  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 7778
    drofluf said:
    boogieman said:
    Thanks guys. Plenty to think about so far. 

    For those who had recent installs, what’s the rough cost of installation? We’d be looking at having the chimney opening widened, installing the liner and a stone or slate hearth put in. 

    @Roland we’ve just bought a place in the countryside so wood supply shouldn’t be an issue. We’ve been grabbing deadfall stuff when we see it on public land (there’s a big oak in the lane next to us that’s been dropping branches) and there’s also plenty of local suppliers for seasoned logs. 
    Make sure it’s properly dry before you try to burn it. Damp wood pollutes more, will gum up your chimney and doesn’t put out as much heat. 
    I hear you. My plan is to build a proper log store when we get warmer, drier weather. There’s currently a brick built thing with a timber lid outside which the previous owner used to keep logs in, but the pointing is shot and the lid is rotting away. There was a load of dried wood in there but it turned out to be only trunks from conifers that had been pruned in the garden. Although it burns ok its like dried cardboard and gives off no heat at all. 
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  • SassafrasSassafras Frets: 21263
    All I know is my neighbour's got one.
    Bloody thing stinks. I think he burns old rubber tyres and oily rags in it.
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  • blobbblobb Frets: 1561
    I've got a clearview stove in the kitchen. It gets pretty cold out here and the clearview is a real beast, all wood comes from the 'estate' and is seasoned before burning. It fully earns it's keep in the winter. For aftercare, I use these guys, midwalestoves who know all there is to know about stoves, fitting them and maintaining them. If you give either of these guys a call I'm sure they will help you out, even if you're not local. Every year the chimney gets a clean and never has the sweep found anything in the there. Clean as a whistle every year, for about ten years now. Such an efficient design.
    Feelin' Reelin' & Squeelin'
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  • fields5069fields5069 Frets: 3749
    Sassafras said:
    All I know is my neighbour's got one.
    Bloody thing stinks. I think he burns old rubber tyres and oily rags in it.
    I still remember the time I was in a mate's garden for a drink, when he started burning bits of his old shed in his chiminea. People do that crap, astounding.
    Some folks like water, some folks like wine.
    My feedback thread is here.
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  • ronnybronnyb Frets: 1144
    Last year contractors were repairing the gym floor at my local leisure centre and I got a load of solid ash that they’d taken up. It burnt a treat kept us warm for ages.
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  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 7778
    Well one of the guys who came earlier has quoted already. Just under £5k for the stove, hearth and installation work. That’s a pisstake I reckon, his price for just the  stove is £5-600 more than I can get it elsewhere online so I wonder where else he’s jacking the price up.   
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  • mgawmgaw Frets: 3988
    We had a new one a couple of years ago, dont think it was really that much tbh..got the chimney relined, and we keep a window open when its on for sure...Its a lovely thing but i dont light it as much as i used to due to the pollution in the room aspect.  will look out the invoices at the weekend and let you know what we paid
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  • chillidoggychillidoggy Frets: 13165
    People with wood burners are definitely posh. The rest of us have to make do with gas.


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  • mgawmgaw Frets: 3988
    People with wood burners are definitely posh. The rest of us have to make do with gas.
    posh in Cornwall is having Gas :)
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