Designing a guitar curriculum (for teachers)

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kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
I'm a guitar teacher and would really like to put together a comprehensive curriculum for learning the guitar from beginner upwards. I've taken a shot at this and got a curriculum together but it's a massive area.
I wondered if some of you (teachers or not!) would like to collaborate on this to develop it as I think it could be really useful.
We would need to host it online somewhere so we could all get access to it to edit - not sure of the best way to do this. You might have some ideas.
Any takers?
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Comments

  • BradBrad Frets: 386
    I’m open to looking into collaborating on it with you :smile: 
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  • Not a teacher...

    I've picked things up in an ad hoc manner over the years and no doubt "wasted" a lot of time along the way regarding real progress, even if I was enjoying myself at the time. I sometimes ponder how I could improve my learning if I could back and teach myself from the beginning...

    I'd have liked to have started by learning to read notation and the notes on the fretboard - along the lines of the beginning pages of Leavitt book 1, but not done to death such as Mel Bay book 1, and with some interesting tunes (I realize book writers are restricted due to copyright etc).

    Having learned the natural notes in the open position, I think I'd introduce the maj scale, it's sound and structure, chords of a scale, how triads are constructed with an explanation of why chords are not just a set of isolated grips. Howard Morgen gives a good description of the guitar's unequal tuning and why chord shapes remain unchanged as we ascend horizontally up the fretboard (E shape stays the same playing E, A at the 5th fret, D at the 10th), but how and why they change as we move across the strings E shape changes to A shape which changes to D shape and all because of that pesky B string!


    Beyond that it starts getting a bit complicated as you take in position playing, different keys, styles - pick/fingerstyle etc.

    Maybe the way I'd have liked to have learned already exists, but was buried in a pile of uninteresting tunes/and exercises.

    Just some of my rambling thoughts, it's certainly a big task!





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  • sev112sev112 Frets: 1302
    Teach them to play a tune on a single string 
    teach them to play some 3 string chords - some on the top 3 strings, some on the bottom 3 strings.
    teach them how to hold a pick and strum / pick up and down

    Do Not EVER pretend that there is something called a Fmajor chord at the 1st fret - deny all existence of it,no matter what their mates say. If pushed, accept that there is such a thing as Fmaj7.  And if really pushed admit that there is such thing as Fmajor but only further up the neck.


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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    Brad said:
    I’m open to looking into collaborating on it with you :smile: 
    Excellent cheers Brad will keep you informed
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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    Not a teacher...

    I've picked things up in an ad hoc manner over the years and no doubt "wasted" a lot of time along the way regarding real progress, even if I was enjoying myself at the time. I sometimes ponder how I could improve my learning if I could back and teach myself from the beginning...

    I'd have liked to have started by learning to read notation and the notes on the fretboard - along the lines of the beginning pages of Leavitt book 1, but not done to death such as Mel Bay book 1, and with some interesting tunes (I realize book writers are restricted due to copyright etc).

    Having learned the natural notes in the open position, I think I'd introduce the maj scale, it's sound and structure, chords of a scale, how triads are constructed with an explanation of why chords are not just a set of isolated grips. Howard Morgen gives a good description of the guitar's unequal tuning and why chord shapes remain unchanged as we ascend horizontally up the fretboard (E shape stays the same playing E, A at the 5th fret, D at the 10th), but how and why they change as we move across the strings E shape changes to A shape which changes to D shape and all because of that pesky B string!


    Beyond that it starts getting a bit complicated as you take in position playing, different keys, styles - pick/fingerstyle etc.

    Maybe the way I'd have liked to have learned already exists, but was buried in a pile of uninteresting tunes/and exercises.

    Just some of my rambling thoughts, it's certainly a big task!





    Yeah there is loads to it for sure. I've outlined an awful lot already, just need more input and opinions
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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    sev112 said:
    Teach them to play a tune on a single string 
    teach them to play some 3 string chords - some on the top 3 strings, some on the bottom 3 strings.
    teach them how to hold a pick and strum / pick up and down

    Do Not EVER pretend that there is something called a Fmajor chord at the 1st fret - deny all existence of it,no matter what their mates say. If pushed, accept that there is such a thing as Fmaj7.  And if really pushed admit that there is such thing as Fmajor but only further up the neck.


    That's not far off my beginner's approach. And yes F and B is a right hurdle for most students!
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  • GrampaGrampa Frets: 336
    Plenty of flexibility to allow the student to focus on the music they like and want to play. Gave up on my one2one teacher as there wasn't enough flexibility in his approach and it tended to be based around the music that he liked. I also found that the weekly lessons focused on individual topics without any discernible link or progression, it felt like being given random pieces of a jigsaw as opposed to starting with the corners, working on the edge pieces before then looking at the complexity of the big picture. 
    Good luck BTW.
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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    Grampa said:
    Plenty of flexibility to allow the student to focus on the music they like and want to play. Gave up on my one2one teacher as there wasn't enough flexibility in his approach and it tended to be based around the music that he liked. I also found that the weekly lessons focused on individual topics without any discernible link or progression, it felt like being given random pieces of a jigsaw as opposed to starting with the corners, working on the edge pieces before then looking at the complexity of the big picture. 
    Good luck BTW.
    Great points I totally agree. I always try and focus on what the pupil wants to learn and give them solid progression. Thanks
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  • axisusaxisus Frets: 20546
    I read the title as

    'Designing a guitar' curriculum

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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    axisus said:
    I read the title as

    'Designing a guitar' curriculum

    Haha, it's complicated enough as it is!
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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    I've got 4 guys together so far to work on this. I've messaged Brad about it. The document will be on Google Docs for us to edit. If anyone else want to jump onboard just shout. 
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  • joeyowenjoeyowen Frets: 3836
    If you want a video chat let me know. I'm a lecturer /curriculum corrdinator for some computing degrees. Also gone through the whole guitar /piano grade system as a student. 

    Can't type much at the moment (broken finger recovery still) so can't really help with the docs thing 


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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    joeyowen said:
    If you want a video chat let me know. I'm a lecturer /curriculum corrdinator for some computing degrees. Also gone through the whole guitar /piano grade system as a student. 

    Can't type much at the moment (broken finger recovery still) so can't really help with the docs thing 


    Nice one thanks for the offer!
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  • koss59koss59 Frets: 661
    In my experience there is no “one size fits all” 
    The age of Youtube has changed the way people learn, I might have a 17 year old lad asking about BB King one week and then Snarky Puppy the next.
    I see it as my job to nurture this and show them what they want to learn, if you don’t then they’ll go to someone that will show them.

    We all know the theory run before you can walk but unfortunately Youtube lessons have altered all that in my experience.
    www.instagram.com/richjevonsguitar
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  • kelpbedskelpbeds Frets: 85
    Yeah totally agree I get the same! I think at the start I teach similar things then it broadens as students become more competent.
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  • koss59 said:
    In my experience there is no “one size fits all” 
    The age of Youtube has changed the way people learn, I might have a 17 year old lad asking about BB King one week and then Snarky Puppy the next.
    I see it as my job to nurture this and show them what they want to learn, if you don’t then they’ll go to someone that will show them.

    We all know the theory run before you can walk but unfortunately Youtube lessons have altered all that in my experience.
    kelpbeds said:
    Yeah totally agree I get the same! I think at the start I teach similar things then it broadens as students become more competent.
    As a pretty recent student,started lessons about 14-15 months ago,I'd say this is how I have been taught and I believe its a good way as I am happy with my progress so far. Youtube helps with ideas but is too fragmented and I believe in having a teacher as it offers a structure to a student's learning journey. 
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  • daveyhdaveyh Frets: 560
    I'm a qualified teacher, an ex head of department. I've written schemes of work and I've taught guitar. Feel free to give me a shout if you think I can help.
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  • RolandRoland Frets: 5616
    koss59 said:
    In my experience there is no “one size fits all” ... I see it as my job to nurture this and show them what they want to learn, if you don’t then they’ll go to someone that will show them.

    We all know the theory run before you can walk but unfortunately Youtube lessons have altered all that in my experience.
    My experience of guitar and similar learning is that we're often coaching students how to teach themselves. Factual information is available on the internet. What's missing is filtering and sequencing topics for a particular student, and providing individual feedback and encouragement.
    Known here as Old Misery Guts or the Big Bad Classified's Sheriff. Also guitarist with  https://www.undercoversband.com/.
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