Sir Clive Sinclair

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  • My father complained to the school that we were taught how to use log books when calculators existed.   
    That would probably have been on the grounds that not all parents could afford to furnish their children with pocket calculators, let alone "scientific" ones.

    The other fear would have been that children just learn the necessary sequences in which to push buttons rather than how to solve the set questions.

    The really smart thing to have taught schoolchildren would have been how to use an abacus. 
    Be seeing you.
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  • Jimbro66Jimbro66 Frets: 2094
    God & Sid's was driven to extinction by the arrival of the scientific calculator.
    As was the engineer's constant companion - the slide rule.

    Sir Clive introduced thousands of youngsters to computer programming, which was certainly no bad thing.

    Wonderful memories there from @equalsql. Sorry to hear in the other thread that Rick Dickinson also passed away not long ago.
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  • guitars4youguitars4you Frets: 9443
    tFB Trader
    log books for math's lessons at school.
    For the benefit of younger readers, "log books" refers to Godfrey & Siddons Four-Figure Tables. (A collection of logarithmic number tables to aid Geometry students. Riveting stuff.) Not to be confused with "log books" for motor vehicles, now properly known as Form V5.


    God & Sid's was driven to extinction by the arrival of the scientific calculator.

    5138008
    I bet I would not have a clue now how to use a log book for any calculation
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  • EricTheWearyEricTheWeary Frets: 12681
    My father complained to the school that we were taught how to use log books when calculators existed.   
    That would probably have been on the grounds that not all parents could afford to furnish their children with pocket calculators, let alone "scientific" ones.

    The other fear would have been that children just learn the necessary sequences in which to push buttons rather than how to solve the set questions.

    The really smart thing to have taught schoolchildren would have been how to use an abacus. 
    We weren’t really poor but I was aware that I generally had less ‘stuff’ than many of my contemporaries although my father would have valued a calculator. But I think it was mandatory to have one at O level maths and although we did spend some time on logarithms they were certainly never a part of any exam. I think it was just a hangover from an older syllabus. 


    I’ll handle this Violet, you take your three hour break. 
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 9206
    edited September 17
    Indeed. Logarithmic tables were a requirement for the O Level syllabus but not for GCSE, when that arrived.


    I bet I would not have a clue now how to use a log book for any calculation
    It was usually for looking up something like the cosine of some angle in a geometric drawing. 

    Referring to the tables book saved pupils the time and effort of properly crunching the relevant numbers - especially if some of them were struggling with the basic arithmetic to begin with.
    Be seeing you.
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  • Def. a pioneer and worthy of respect.   Doubtless helped kick off hundreds of thousands of coding careers.

    I went the 6502 route - BBC, dragon, etc. not the Z80 but got a ZX81knocking about that still works.
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  • sev112sev112 Frets: 1427
    I bought a Psion 3a in the mid 90s (?).  Rather than use it as a pda, I write numerous papers in it, the spreadsheet was suprisingky useful for engineering calls, and I wrote programs for other engineering calcs.  It was  great too for a good number of years before it died
    what I really liked was the ergonomics and aesthetics of it.  Even with the power of my ipad and phone, I loved the keyboard, the way it folded in half smoothly, and the fact that it did just slip into your pocket
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  • guitars4youguitars4you Frets: 9443
    tFB Trader
    Indeed. Logarithmic tables were a requirement for the O Level syll

    abus but not for GCSE, when that arrived.

    I bet I would not have a clue now how to use a log book for any calculation
    It was usually for looking up something like the cosine of some angle in a geometric drawing. 

    Referring to the tables book saved pupils the time and effort of properly crunching the relevant numbers - especially if some of them were struggling with the basic arithmetic to begin with.
    just had a look at a log book via  a google search - can't recall how we worked anything out on it at all - As you said it was part of our syllabus at school - My daughter's best friend is at Cambridge Uni - Physics and Maths are her 2 key subjects - She has never seen a log book 

    Not sure when log books stopped as part of the syllabus - I'm guessing early 80's - I left school in 78
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  • DeadmanDeadman Frets: 3126
    edited September 17
    wibble said:


    10 PRINT "RIP"
    20 GOTO 10

    My first introduction to computers was my cousin's ZX81 and then I got a Spectrum. Learnt to program BASIC and Z80 assembler on it. Plus played loads of games of course.

    We used to do this to ALL the computers on our lads days out in the shops circa 1983. It was never RIP though.

    But, RIP Sir Clive. Another bit of my childhood gone.
    “There’s a man with a mullet going mad with a mallet in Millets”  - HMHB
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  • sev112 said:
    I bought a Psion 3a in the mid 90s (?).  Rather than use it as a pda, I write numerous papers in it, the spreadsheet was suprisingky useful for engineering calls, and I wrote programs for other engineering calcs.  It was  great too for a good number of years before it died
    what I really liked was the ergonomics and aesthetics of it.  Even with the power of my ipad and phone, I loved the keyboard, the way it folded in half smoothly, and the fact that it did just slip into your pocket
    I had a II and an LZ , used to lust after a 5 when it came out, did you ever try the keyboard on those , wow 
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  • maw4neumaw4neu Frets: 357
    Genius . . . RIP Sir Clive
    Id just like to point out that, despite all the video and DNA evidence, it genuinely wasn't me, your Honour  ! 

    Feedback : https://www.thefretboard.co.uk/discussion/58125/
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  • OffsetOffset Frets: 1067
    Let's hope the old chap gets a fitting send-off.


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