Would this be an OK PC for home recording and producing

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Dell Optiplex Intel 5, 16gb ram, tower.

It's basically a bog standard office pc, but the warranties good, it's well priced, and nominally at least, it seems to fulfill the system requirements of even the most advanced Cubase pro DAW software.

Any advice appreciated and will be confirmed elsewhere.


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  • Dell Optiplex Intel 5, 16gb ram, tower.

    It's basically a bog standard office pc, but the warranties good, it's well priced, and nominally at least, it seems to fulfill the system requirements of even the most advanced Cubase pro DAW software.

    Any advice appreciated and will be confirmed elsewhere.


    It depends which generation of i5, really. If it's one of the quad-core ones, then it'll be fine (especially if you put an SSD in it). If it's dual-core...might be a bit more problematic.
    <space for hire>
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  • @Smellyfingers ;

    see the other thread, regarding computer specs, 

    "
    I did loads of multitracking with Reaper on a Dell Latitude Core 2 duo with 2Gb ram. But it was optimised for audio in terms of good drivers for my interface and nothing unnecessary like Office fast find . iTunes updater, MS one drive etc running in the background."
    “Ken sent me.”
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  • Things will also depend on how much work you do in your daw.
    You will probably be fine with drums, bass and guitars. If you and loads of other stuff and max out the plugins it will probably get sluggish 
    The Bigsby was the first successful design of what is now called a whammy bar or tremolo arm, although vibrato is the technically correct term for the musical effect it produces. In standard usage, tremolo is a rapid fluctuation of the volume of a note, while vibrato is a fluctuation in pitch. The origin of this nonstandard usage of the term by electric guitarists is attributed to Leo Fender, who also used the term “vibrato” to refer to what is really a tremolo effect.
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  • SnapSnap Frets: 5159
    I guess you know the real answer - see how you go. One thing to think about doing is aiming to bounce as many midi tracks to audio. For example, a synth like Omnisphere 2 is quite CPU heavy. So, (and same goes for anything in midi), once you are happy with the track, convert it audio and save the project as a new version of the original. Then you have the original to go back to if you need.

    You can repeat that for as many tracks as you like and then consider bouncing a few tracks into another one, to cut down the processing load. 

    There are some VSTs that are v heavy on CPU. Anything adaptive (such as a dynamic EQ or limiter) can be demanding.

    Having said all that, it could well be OK. 
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